Blog

What Does the Great American Smokeout Have to Do with Lung Cancer Risk?

November 7, 2017

What is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout? It's an annual event, held the third Thursday of every November, a date on which smokers nationwide are asked to give up smoking. This year, 2017, that means it’s on November 16th. Quitting for just one day helps you take action toward a healthier life, and reduce your lung cancer risk.

Each year, the Great American Smokeout calls attention to the deaths, lung cancer diagnoses and other chronic diseases that smoking causes, and how to prevent them. As a result of this event, there have been actions taken towards reducing the health impacts that smoking can have on smokers and non-smokers including:

  • Many states and local governments have banned smoking in restaurants, public spaces, and workplaces.
  • Increased taxes on cigarettes
  • Limiting of cigarette advertisements and product placements.

Read More Categories: Lung Cancer

What to Eat While Going Through Cancer Treatment

October 19, 2017

What you eat while going through cancer treatment is often a bit different from a typical diet. Partly this is because of the different side effects patients experience before, during, and after cancer treatments. Food many not sound enticing, or the nausea brought on by treatment could make it especially hard to eat regularly. Additionally some patients undergoing cancer treatments report less saliva in their mouths, also called dry-mouth, that can make it unpleasant to eat. However, it's still really important that patients take in the right amount of calories so they can keep up their strength and avoid dropping to an unhealthy weight.

Read More Categories: Cancer Management

What Do You Know About Mammograms?

October 9, 2017

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, making it a great time to learn a little more about breast cancer screenings for yourself or a loved one. The information below will help you better understand why mammograms are important, other potential screening methods, when you should be screened and what can be done if someone needs a mammogram but cannot afford one. This knowledge can help you be better informed so you can share it with others this October, as well as the rest of the year.

Read More Categories: Breast Cancer

5 Important Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Prostate Cancer

September 29, 2017

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men according to the Center for Disease Control. Here are five things you should be aware of so that you or your loved one can be aware of any additional risk factors they may have.

1. Prostate Cancer Can Be Inherited

If your father or brother(s) have had prostate cancer, research shows that you are at a higher risk for developing it too. The more immediate family members with prostate cancer the higher your own risk becomes.

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5 Signs and Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer That Every Woman Should Know

September 15, 2017

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, so it's a good time to learn more about early detection to help save lives. Certain risk factors, including being overweight and a history of ovarian cancer in the family, may increase your chances of being diagnosed. Ovarian cancer research clinical trials are underway, but it's still good for patients to be educated about detecting ovarian cancer early.

Read More Categories: Ovarian Cancer

How Eating Healthy Foods Can Help Prevent Cancer

August 30, 2017

Eating a healthy, balanced diet provides your body with vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to get you through your day. But did you know that eating a healthy diet can also reduce your risk of certain types of cancers? Discover some cancer-fighting foods that may be no further away than your pantry or refrigerator.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention

What You Should Know About Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer

August 24, 2017

Oral, head and neck cancer is cancer that begins in the internal tissue of somewhere in your mouth, neck or head -- excluding cancers of the eye, skin, and brain. The major areas that are usually affected by this type of cancer include:

  • sinuses
  • nasal cavity
  • salivary glands
  • pharynx (the part of the upper part of the throat that's right behind the mouth)
  • larynx (the lower part of the throat that holds the voice box)
  • gums
  • cheek lining
  • lips
  • floor of mouth
  • hard palate
  • gum behind the wisdom teeth

Read More Categories: Cancer Risk, Oral, Head and Neck

Pay Attention to Your Lymph Nodes for Cancer Signs

July 24, 2017

Lymph nodes (also called lymph glands) are part of your immune system, and they let you know when your body is fighting an infection by becoming enlarged or sensitive to the touch. They also function as an early warning system for some types of cancer.

What are Lymph Nodes?

Lymph is a clear fluid that circulates throughout your body, bringing nutrients to cells and carrying away bacteria and waste products. This fluid flows through a special system of tiny vessels in your body, passing through small bean-shaped filtering organs called lymph nodes. Some nodes are as large as an inch across, while others are as small as a pinhead.

Read More Categories: Cancer Risk

When Should You Get a Prostate Cancer Screening?

July 17, 2017

Are you interested in learning about prostate cancer screening? It's important to remember that many perfectly healthy people are screened for prostate cancer as part of their regular health care. Doctors sometimes recommend testing simply because of your age or family history. Other times, patients have some symptoms, and their doctor may suggest a prostate cancer screening as the first step to understanding the problem.

Read More Categories: Prostate Cancer

Meet Your Team: Heather Wood, RN, BSN, OCN

July 10, 2017

“The most important thing our patients need to know is they are going to be taken care of. We’re their team. We’re their people and we’re going to get them through this.”

Heather Wood has been an oncology nurse since 2009. She knows firsthand the life-changing impact of cancer on both patients and their families, having gone through treatment with her mom, a breast cancer survivor. Heather is very approachable. Her goal is to do everything possible to make a difficult journey easier. Education is essential in that goal. In her role as Nurse Educator, Heather provides chemo education at all Compass sites and leads community educational events. Knowing what’s happening and why is an important step in alleviating fear regarding chemo. She is also an active member of the Survivorship team and teaches Compass chemo standards to new team members.

When not a work, Heather loves spending time with her husband, gardening, house projects and a good book.

Learn more about Heather

Read More Categories: Meet Your Team